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Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA)

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Jonas Buche (Leibniz Universität Hannover)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 from 14.30 – 18.00 h

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

Since the publication of the seminal work “The Comparative Method” by Charles Ragin in 1987, set-theoretic methods and especially Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) have become a common research strategy in the social sciences. Set-theoretic methods analyze cases with regard to the identification of sufficient and necessary conditions and assume set relations to be equifinal, conjunctural and asymmetric. Not least since so-called fuzzy sets have been introduced to the method, there has been a rising interest in QCA as a welcome alternative to both small-n case studies and large-n statistical analyses. In short, QCA is recommended if ‘if…then’ hypotheses are analyzed; if the goal is to derive sufficient and necessary conditions; if a comparison is planned; and if there is a mid-sized number of cases (between 10 and 60+).

The course offers a comprehensive introduction to QCA and is both conceptually and technically oriented. It starts off with an overview of the basics of set theory and demarcates QCA as a case-oriented method from both the quantitative and the interpretive-qualitative research paradigm. Through the notion of necessary and sufficient conditions and of truth tables, the single elements are built into the Truth Table Algorithm. However, this algorithm is not free of problems. Therefore, some pitfalls and strategies how to overcome them are presented. At the third day, the software tool fsQCA will be introduced and applied to published studies.

No prior knowledge is required. We will use the software fsQCA2.5 which can be downloaded at www.fsqca.com.

Pre-readings and recommended literature:

  • Cebotari, Victor, and Maarten P. Vink (2013). “A Configurational Analysis of Ethnic Protest in Europe.” In International Journal of Comparative Sociology, Vol. 54(4), 298-324.
  • Emmenegger, Patrick. (2011). “Job Security Regulations in Western Democracies. A Fuzzy Set Analysis.” In European Journal of Political Research, Vol. 50(3), 336-64.
  • Freitag, Markus, and Raphaela Schlicht (2009). “Educational Federalism in Germany. Foundations of Social Inequality in Education.” In Governance, Vol. 22(1), 47-72.
  • Schneider, Carsten Q./Wagemann, Claudius, 2012. Set-Theoretic Methods for the Social Sciences. A Guide to Qualitative Comparative Analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Ragin, Charles C., 2008. Redesigning Social Inquiry. Fuzzy Sets and Beyond. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Goertz, Gary/Mahoney, James, 2012. A Tale of Two Cultures: Quantitative and Qualitative Research in the Social Sciences. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Developing Theoretical Contributions

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Jenny Gibb (The University of Waikato, New Zealand)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 (09:00 – 12:30)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

All research is based on theory, but not all theory is based on research. If this claim is true, it is essential for every scholar to understand what theory is, what theory is not, which types of theory there are, how to skillfully apply, extend, build on and connect extant theories and even, how to develop a new theory. In this course, we will examine why this is the case and work to systematically build understanding on how to develop theory and conceptual contributions. In working on theory and conceptual paper development we intend to deepen participants’ appreciation of theory building and to assist them to craft potentially valuable and effective research papers. The course has a practical orientation in that it is application centred. It is not a philosophy of science course.

Pre-readings and recommended literature:

  • Bettis, R. A., Gambardella, A., Helfat, C., & Mitchell, W. 2014. Theory in strategic management. Strategic Management Journal, 35(10): 1411-1413.
  • Corley, K. G. & Gioia, D. A. 2011. Building Theory about Theory Building: What Constitutes a Theoretical Contribution? Academy of Management Review, 36(1): 12-32.
  • Whetten, D. A. 1989. What Constitutes A Theoretical Contribution? Academy of Management Review, 14(4): 490-495.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Qualitative Network Analysis

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Tom Töpfer (University of Bremen)

Date: Thursday, 14/09/17 (09.30 – 18.00)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

The growing field of Social Network Analysis (SNA) is dominated by mathematical reasoning. In recent years, however, shortcomings in the adequate interpretation of social meaning and actor-focused questions have led to more qualitative approaches that are often combined with quantitative techniques in mixed-methods designs. This workshop gives an overview of qualitative approaches and methods used in studying social networks and discusses their advantages and disadvantages.

Combining foundations of qualitative research and network analysis, participants will get an insight into fundamental theoretical and methodological concepts. We will outline basic principles used in qualitative network research and illustrate objectives and questions that are applicable with a qualitative perspective. The workshop introduces techniques and methods for qualitative data collection and analysis. In addition, we will illustrate practical implications by using empirical studies from a variety of research fields.

The format of the workshop relies on presentations of the basic concepts, concrete examples from research practice, hands-on strategies and open discussion slots. The workshop also provides the possibility to present own research projects of the participants dealing with qualitative network analysis. Therefore, participants are encouraged to hand in qualitative network material from own empirical projects in advance, so that their work can be discussed in the workshop.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

Hollstein, Betina (2011): Qualitative Approaches. Iin: Scott, J. & Carrington, P. J. (Eds.). The SAGE Handbook of Social Network Analysis. London/New Delhi: SAGE Publications (pp. 404–417).

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Questionnaire Design

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Dr. David Richter (German Institute for Economic Research – DIW Berlin)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 (09:00 – 12:30)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

The course aims to provide an overview of the theoretical basics and empirical evidence related to questionnaire design. The cognitive process of survey responding, challenges of designing effective survey questions including aspects of proper question wording and optimal response formats, as well as pretest techniques for evaluating survey questions will be discussed.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Call for Papers: Hamburg International Conference for Logistics (HICL) – 12./13. Oct. 2017

The eleventh Hamburg International Conference of Logistics (HICL), hosted by the Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) invites you to participate on the 12 & 13 October 2017 and for an additional Ph.D. seminar on the 11 October 2017.

Recent advances in artificial intelligence and automation, as well as ever-increasing capacities of smart devices, have created a whole new business ecosystem. Additionally, customers are demanding more innovative, more diverse and greener products. This creates numerous challenges for all actors in the supply chain; yet, they also present a chance to create solutions and practices that improve performance and productivity. HICL 2017 focuses on research concepts and ideas that enable these tools and ideas to be used in logistics and SCM. For this year’s theme: Logistics and Supply Chain Management meet Digitalization

Empirical, theoretical, methodological and practical contributions addressing topics related to one of the following tracks:

  • Innovation and Technology Management
  • Risk and Security Management
  • Sustainability and City Logistics
  • Maritime and Port Logistics
  • Advanced Manufacturing and Industry 4.0

Conference Chairs

  • Prof. Dr. Dr. h. c. Wolfgang Kersten (Institute of Business Logistics and General Management, TUHH)
  • Prof. Dr. Thorsten Blecker (Institute of Business Logistics and General Management, TUHH)
  • Prof. Dr. Christian M. Ringle (Institute for Human Resource Management and Organizations, TUHH)
  • Prof. Dr.-Ing. Carlos Jahn (Institute of Maritime Logistics, TUHH)
  • Prof. Dr. Kai Hoberg (Supply Chain and Operations Strategy, Kühne Logistics University)

Important Dates

26 May 2017: Abstract Submission closes
03 July 2017: Paper Submission closes

More information

Handling of Missing Data

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Martin Spiess (University of Hamburg)

Date: Thursday, 14/09/17 (09.30 – 18.00)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

If the missing information is selective with respect to the research question, then simply ignoring unobserved information or applying other ‘ad hoc’ methods usually leads to invalid inferences, i.e. to biased estimators or actual rejection rates of ‘true’ null hypotheses being too high. In this seminar, basics of the missing data problem and some techniques to compensate missing values are discussed. A main topic in the introductory part is the missing data mechanisms, i.e. the mechanism that led to the missing information. The way how to deal with the missing data problem such that scientifically interesting inferences are valid depends mainly on assumptions about this process. A particularly important question is whether the precise missing mechanism can be ignored in downstream analysis, or if it as to be modelled explicitly. In the second part, an overview of various approaches to deal with the missing data problem is given. Besides ‘ad-hoc’ techniques which often lead to invalid inferences, model-based approaches like maximum likelihood methods as well as weighting and imputation methods will be considered. Most of the latter methods assume that the missing mechanism is ignorable. However, we will also consider a simple approach to estimate a model based on a non-ignorable missing mechanism. The third part deals with one missing data technique in more detail: Multiple imputations to deal with missing items. The concepts are illustrated with the help of examples, the software used is R.

Statistical knowledge on the master level of an applied science programme is required.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

Spiess, M. (2016). Dealing with missing values. In: C. Wolf, D. Joye, T.W. Smith and Y. Fu (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Survey Methodology (Chapter 37, pp. 595-610). Sage Publications: Thousand Oaks, CA.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Case Study Research

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Dr. Kamil Marcinkiewicz (University of Hamburg)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 – Wednesday, 13/09/17 (14.30 – 18.00)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

The case study research is frequently applied in the social sciences. It is particularly popular among political scientists, especially those specializing in area studies. The ubiquity of the case study research contrasts with the scarcity of theoretical reflection on its core methodological aspects. Also the benefits of comparative analyses are often underestimated. In this course participants will have an opportunity to learn more about what the case study research is, what are its weakness and strengths and how should we go about the core question in designing a case study: selection of cases. The course combines lectures with practical exercises and discussion of students’ projects.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

  • Gerring, J. (2007). Case Study Research: Principles and Practices (pp. 17-63). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • George, A. L., & Bennett, A. (2005). Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences (pp. 1-34). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Rueschemeyer, D. (2003). Can One or a Few Cases Yield Theoretical Gains? In J. Mahoney and D. Rueschemeyer (Eds.), Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences (pp. 305-337) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Hall, P.A. (2008). Systematic Process Analysis: When and How to Use it. European Political Science, 7(3), 304-317.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Researching, Writing, and Publishing a Literature Review

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Christina Hoon (Bielefeld University)

Date: Thursday, 14/09/17 (09:30 – 18:00)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

As you embark on your PhD, or indeed any research undertaking, you always start with producing a review of the existing literature on the topic of your research field. However, given that a literature review constitutes a study in itself, a review study can also be one of the separate, publishable papers your PhD thesis consists of.

This workshop outlines the purpose, scope, methods, and contribution of a literature review. What constitutes a good literature review? How do you evaluate and assess the broad range of knowledge and information? How do you make a substantive contribution, thereby producing a publishable paper? This course will address the different forms of literature reviews (systematic reviews, meta-synthesis, meta-analysis). The analytical tools and methods of each of these different forms of a review are offered, along with illustrative examples. This course is structured to guide students throughout the process of conducting and writing a literature review: identifying and developing individual research interests, searching for relevant information resources, assessing and evaluating the extant literature, and concluding with the writing of a literature review.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

Rousseau, D.M., Manning, J. and Denyer, D. (2008). Chapter 11: Evidence in management and organizational science: Assembling the field’s full weight to scientific knowledge through synthesis. Academy of Management Annals, 2, pp. 475–515.

Torraco, R.J. (2005). Writing integrative literature reviews: Guidelines and examples. Human Resource Development Review, 4, pp. 356-367.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Grounded Theory

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Christina Hoon (Bielefeld University)

Date: Monday, 11/09/17 (09:00 – 12:30) – Wednesday, 13/09/17 (09:00 – 12:30)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

The key purpose of this workshop is to increase participants’ understanding of the key concepts, strategies, and steps in grounded theory research. This workshop intends to deepen theoretical and practical understanding of the constant comparative method, open, axial and selective coding. Further, the participants will learn the key elements of theoretical sampling, theoretical saturation, and theoretical sensitivity. In addition, common challenges and pitfalls in grounded theory research will be discussed. To assist participants to craft valuable and effective research papers, exemplars from current research projects will be assessed and critically reviewed.

Literature

  • Charmaz, K. (2006). Constructing grounded theory: A practical guide through qualitative analysis. London, UK: Sage.
  • Gioia, D. A., Corley, K. G., & Hamilton, A. (2013). Seeking qualitative rigor in inductive research: Notes on the Gioia methodology. Organizational Research Methods, 16, 15-31.
  • Strauss, A., & Corbin, J. (1998). Basics of qualitative research: Grounded theory procedures and techniques (2nd Ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.

Measuring Preferences using Conjoint Analytic Methods and Advanced Compositional Approaches

Institution: see Organisers & Supporters

Programme of study: International Research Workshop

Lecturer: Assoc. Prof. Martin Meissner (University of Southern Denmark/Department of Environmental and Business Economics)

Date: Thursday, 14/09/17 (09:30 – 18:00)

Max. number of participants: 20

Credit Points: 5 CP for participating in the whole IRWS

Language of instruction: English

Contents:

The participants of this course develop a sound understanding of the benefits of using conjoint analytic preferences measurement approaches and alternative advanced compositional approaches. Participants gain practical experience of using conjoint-analytic methods, and developed a better understanding of the value of measuring preferences.

The course starts with introducing the basic concepts behind the measurement of stated preferences, specifically focusing on conjoint analysis. The most often used approaches, i.e. traditional conjoint analysis, adaptive conjoint analysis and choice-based conjoint analysis are introduced. We deliberate on advantages and disadvantages of the approaches and also discuss advanced compositional approaches, like pairwise-comparison based preference measurement and the adaptive self-explicated approach. During the workshop we will further talk about all the important stages of designing a preference measurement study. We pay special attention to the types of research questions that conjoint analysis can answer. We also discuss the most important questions you should answer before setting up your preference measurement/conjoint study: What is the optimal choice of attributes and attribute level? What is a good experimental design? How should I design my survey design and present potential choice scenarios? How do I analyze the results?

Participants will have the opportunity to use Sawtooth Software on their own laptops and build their own conjoint analysis survey during the course. Based on this experience, participants will be able to improve the planning of their own future experiments.

Recommended literature and pre-readings:

  • Bradlow, Eric T. (2005), “Current Issues and a ‘Wish List’ for Conjoint Analysis,” Applied Stochastic Models in Business and Industry, 21 (4-5), 319-323.
  • Hauser, John R. and Vithala Rao (2003), “Conjoint Analysis, Related Modeling, and Applications,” In Marketing Research and Modeling: Progress and Prospects, Wind, Jerry and Paul Green (eds.), New York: Springer, 141-168.

You have to register for the 11th International Research Workshop to participate in this course.